French bike maker introduces the new Alpe d’Huez – everything you wanted to know

Introduction

Where lightness and stiffness meet. The new Alpe d’Huez bike is the lightest bike that TIME has ever created. But it is also competitively stiff for power efficiency as well as those surpise uphill attacks, responsive and precise for mountain descents and comfortable for long days in the saddle. Discover our limited edition ulteam bike Alpe d’Huez.

Lightness

Alpe d’Huez 01 is the lightest bike that TIME has ever developed: -8,6% less than its predecessor, the Izon. To achieve this, we have developed a brand new optimized structure. The carbon braids, developed according to the desired mechanical characteristics allowed for the removal of the finishing fabric. These braids are meticulously positioned on the frame and remain apparent in the finished frame. A new thinner and lighter seat was also developed to match this new frame.

Stiffness

TIME worked on the lightness of the Alpe d’Huez bike, while improving the stiffness characteristics. This gives more than 25% on the stiffness/weight ratio compared to its predecessor, Izon. You will feels liveliness, responsiveness and power when pedaling. To achieve these characteristics, we have been working with high modulus fibers, a BB386 bottom bracket and a directlink seat tube to allows better energy transfer. The sloping geometry of the frame has been adapted for performance in the mountains. The Alpe d’Huez is the ideal bike for this type of terrain, responsive on the climb and precise on the descent.

3km of fibers to build a Time bike

Thanks to our RTM and braiding of carbon fibers technologies, we have a very wide choice of different braids. All our braids have very precise mechanical characteristics. They come from many studies, especially on the choice of fibers used for their manufacture. This results in unique sensations perceived during the pedaling movement.

7300 carbon braids are needed to make a TIME frame. We have a wide choice in the type of wire used and a very high precision in the positioning of the son on the frame. We choose exactly what type of wire for which braid and which part of the frame. We thus obtain very precise mechanical characteristics according to our expectations.

73 braids are used for the manufacture of the frame. The structure is thus homogeneous and the fibers remain continuous on the structure. This results in a better transfer of mechanical properties.

 An engineer’s viewpoint: Discussion with our composite engineer, Frédéric Laget.

When developing a new bike, which steps do you have to go through?

First step is creating. We have to determine a customer target. Engineers, designers and marketing executives work together on that part. We have to agree on a global objective, a global idea and a targeted cost. Depending on the targeted cost, engineers search for technical solutions and state on a possible real cost.

As soon as the global objective has been determined, designers prepare drawings and we then take a decision on the definitive design.

Then, we work on an actual clay model. We need three to four weeks to make it. First feedbacks and adjustments come from this model’s analysis.

Once we have validated the model, we draw it again thanks to a CAD program. We defines sections, we measure each tube’s shape, height and dimension. Our program computes all of these data again.

After that, we work on the frame’s structure. We take a decision on the braids we should use and their positions thanks to the different fibers types we have.

We then manufacture our first prototype, and we test it: lab tests at first, followed by field tests. We process many lab tests to check the frame’s rigidity, endurance and resistance. Those tests make it possible for us to make adjustments, by adding rigidity on some frame parts thanks to other more braids for instance.

In the long run, field tests provide insights regarding actual feelings that we can’t analyze thanks to lab tests.

We have to pass standards tests, but we generally go even further to guarantee our products’ quality.

Once we have validated every step, we start producing our frames in every size.

The “Alpe d’Huez” bike is the lightest bike Time has ever developed, was that your global objective at the beginning of the project?

Weight was one of the criteria we wanted to work on because we wanted to create a bike designed for long climbs. However, that was not the main criteria in our minds. We wanted to manufacture a frame that would be light, reactive, vigorous and comfortable in the same time. The combination of those elements makes it possible to get a bike with a balanced behavior. This particularity makes Time bikes’ legend.

When creating a bike, do you sometimes have to face surprises in terms of weight, rigidity and performance, or do you settle everything at the beginning?

No, we do not. Obviously, we cannot anticipate everything and we often face things we did not expect. Several departments work the product’s different parts and we have to put all of this work together in order to have an optimal result.

Every time we make changes on the product, we have to go through other test and validation steps, this extends the development time.

What is the difference between a bike designed for climbing and a bike focused on aerodynamics? 

We do not work on the same geometrics when we focus on aerodynamics. The rider will need to be very low, put a lot of strength on his pedals and stay in packs… Climbers behave very differently.

For mountain rides, the bike needs to be reactive, light, comfortable and very precise regarding descents driving. This is a very different effort. We have to find the perfect balance between all of those elements and rigidity. If the bike is too hard, it will not provide enough feelings to the rider. The bike has to be one with the rider; it has to react to any push. The rider needs to feel that the bike reacts instantly.

You have a unique manufacturing process as you make carbon fiber braids that then create a frame. When creating a climbing bike, which kind of braids do you use? Does it differ from other bikes?

Indeed, our RTM manufacturing process makes it possible to be very precise on the frame’s characteristics which depend on the initial choice regarding the fibers we use. We can choose between 25 different types of fiber, each of us has different characteristics. We need around 7000 braids to manufacture a frame.
All of the frame’s future behavior depends on this initial choice and on the braids’ manufacturing. The places where we put those braids and the way we put them are very important to get the frame behavior we are looking for.

According to our lab tests, we make slight adjustments on the fibers we use and the places where we put them.

Regarding the Alpe d’Huez 01, we mostly use high modulus fibers (60%) that are very rigid and resistant. We also use high resistance fibers (37%) that are less rigid. We also use Vectran fibers (3%) to absorb vibrations and provide more comfort.

You have been using the same manufacturing process for 30 years now. You must have a great choice of fibers and braids now. Is that something you work on every time you create a new frame, or do you use some of your “old” fibers and braids?

With 30 years of research and development, we obviously have an enormous braids library. We have around 100 of them, each one having different characteristics. However, when we have a special need we create a new one: this is custom-made.

For the Alpe d’Huez 21, we developed a braid by using basalt fiber because it absorbs vibration. Rossignol racing skis have the same technology.

As an engineer, what does that technology change in terms of work, compared to competitors?

We start from the bottom: a wire, a fiber. Then we have to study the impact it will have on the bike’s behavior. The process is similar to jewelry or haute couture: we carefully chose each piece and put it as a very precise spot. If we move this piece, all of the bike’s behavior might change. We have to be very careful on our operating method we use with the people in charge of creating the braids.

Another very interesting part is that we go through every manufacturing step: from the initial brief to tests and then production.

Your factories are located in France, how does it help you in your daily work?

This brings unique productivity and comfort. Following tests, we can achieve lab and field adjustments very fast, as well as talks between all the people involved in the project.

We also have permanent control on the products we manufacture. All of the people working with us – commercials, engineers, designers… – can see the product and give their opinions. This is the big benefit that makes Time bikes’ fame.

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